The last few lines from Samuel Beckett’s The Unnameable (L’Innommable) have been on my mind.

It will be I? It will be the silence, where I am? I don’t know, I’ll never know: in the silence you don’t know.
            You must go on.
            I can’t go on.
            I’ll go on.

Such a strong feeling that I am between places. Anohni, when she was Antony, said she was scared of the middle place, the one between light and nowhere. But this isn’t about “the passing”. This is about the weird drag of wanting something to happen but not wanting it because it isn’t a good thing. On the surface it’s all very humdrum – the time dust that settles on my life layers deep and I can’t be moved to brush it away.

I went back for some more cryotherapy on my lungs. I came and went with the familiar operation in-between. I didn’t speak after with any medical staff. I figured if there was something they wanted to tell me, they would seek me out. Even the radical is banal now.

I had a letter from the Hospice. It told me that I was being discharged from their active casebook because they hadn’t heard from me (the explicit arrangement was that there would not be any need for contact until I got really sick, but I wanted to be known to them). It was like being chucked out of the disco by the bouncers for something you hadn’t done. The Death Disco, in this case. Should I complain? Do I really want to be allowed back in that particular club? There was no-one there I fancied anyway. Maybe I should just trudge home alone through the streets of the living. I can always go back. They’ll save the last dance for me.

My bank took away my old gold credit card. They replaced it with a new one, a new type of deal that matters nothing to me. It’s a new colour. Now, even my credit card is black.

Jenny Diski died of her cancer last week. One less Death Lit auteur for us all. Nobody was better at having cancer than she was. Her memoir “In Gratitude” has only just been published. I ordered it in tribute.

“Under no circumstances is anyone to say that I lost a battle with cancer. Or that I bore it bravely. I am not fighting, losing, winning or bearing,”

We should respect that, but we can still note that she met Death the mugger in a dark alley, and she faced down her assailant with a sharp wit and dignity. I’d like to emulate that.

It’s Spring, so I went to my favourite Bluebell wood to see the hazy waves of shimmering blueness among the trees. It did not disappoint. But with all the Easter 1916 stuff swirling in my mind, I could only think about Padraic Pearse and his poem written on the eve of his execution:

“The beauty of the world hath made me sad, This beauty that will pass” 

The next doctor I see will tell me about a possible Phase 1 drug trial. Yet another possible cure for Cancer that needs a guinea pig. I’ll listen carefully to the list of side effects, and if that doesn’t sound too bad, then who knows, I may say yes?

Until then, I drift.