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A rough, rough month. Down and downer all the days as my tumours now start to take the upper hand. As Kafka once said about his TB: “My head and lungs have come to an agreement without my knowledge“.

I went for a regular bronchoscopy plus cryotherapy in early September. They injected the tracheal tumour four times but the bleeding was hard and they couldn’t see what they were doing very well. Each time it bleeds, they have to swap the needle for a suction and with adrenaline etc they get it under control and then try again. A slow process. They said it would need attention again but sooner than usual. In the end, they called me for a CT scan, and a week after for a meeting to discuss the results. I was sure the message would be that they’d done all they could, and must now stop. In fact, it was the opposite. They wanted to escalate it up to a more interventionist surgical procedure (a rigid bronchoscopy as opposed to the usual flexible bronchoscopy).

That went ahead this week. General anaesthetic required. Nonetheless, an early start at 7:30 meant I was back on ward by 10:00 and discharged by 4:00pm. The ‘new’ surgeon took on the trachea tumour and the before/after photos were amazing. From an angry bloody abrasion of white pinked with bloody veins to a smooth surface. It is a really good outcome, better than I dared expect. The ‘regular’ surgeon was then able to get around the corner to the bronchial tumour and he had a good go at that. They will return to it again. All of this is in the centre/left lung. On the right side, there is a central tumour that is now over 4cm in size. A grape is around 2cm; a plum is between 4-6cm. But that doesn’t cause any issue, so it is ignored for the present.

The tumerous lump pressing on my bladder was also highlighted from the CT scan, but I’ll have to get the Piss Factory involved on that one. It may mean getting the old catheter treatment again. Bah!

Weirdest of all are the stomach issues. I’ve had a generous lump of scar tissue near my solar plexus since the op in 2009. It just seems to be pressing more on me now. Stomach acid is a major issue and I haven’t had a meal in weeks. Yogurt, jelly, and milky cereal are my only respite. I’ve lost 3Kg in just a month. I keep mentioning it to doctors, but it isn’t on any current agenda for lung or urology, so I now have to push on the hospital until I get somewhere. It’s a full time job getting it all sorted.

It could be the scar tissue, but the other possibility is cytokines. Cancer causes the body to react as it would to say, the ‘flu. So I get these erratic surges in temperature and shaking etc. Cytokines are also good appetite suppressants.

When you have such localised problem areas it’s hard not to use the old cancer-as-battleground metaphor. Each one a front where the enemy must be confronted. I fell back on a book I first read years ago as a student – Susan Sontag’s “Illness as Metaphor“. She compares the C19th attitude towards TB with the C20th attitude towards Cancer. Cancer, unlike TB, is a disease which nobody has managed to glamourise. TB in its heyday had a much better image – pale, interesting, wan, sad, weary, melancholic, romantic. And yet, I remember walking as a child with my parents in the grounds of the local TB hospital. It was an old country house and estate that had been compulsorily acquired to open the sanatorium. It was spring, and the path was lined with daffodils. I was sternly commanded not to touch them, let alone pick them, in case they had been spat on. Now, I’m one of the unclean.

The two most common metaphors Sontag’s analysis uncovered are what she termed “violence” metaphors – fights, battles wars, etc, – and “journey” metaphors. Both bring problems. We’ve talked before about the patient shaming that is the baggage of the war metaphor. No matter how brave the soldier, they will become the fallen. We must accept their loss and carry on the fight. And those fat people who won’t change their lifestyle? Well, they may as well be the enemy within.

It’s all a load of tosh. If you want an analogy, your body is a million delicate instruments operating in tandem. That one or two goes out of sync should not be a surprise. We just need to know how and why, so a pill will correct it. Soon come!

I got to thinking about metaphors for cancer in general.

War

The big one. Trigger words are war, battle, fight, win/lose, struggle, body as battlefield. Other words to watch out for: blitz, air raid, all-clear. I tell you this, if it is a battle, then I’m the ravaged battlefield and not the General in command.

It can be a different type of war. The body is the internal battlefield, the homeland or home front. In this one, cancer is the spy, traitor, enemy within, or double agent. This one is a cold war.

Sometimes, you are up against a silent killer, an assassin. Cowardly cancer. It is your personal nemesis, stalking just you and ignoring all others. W.H. Auden said it first (“It’s like some hidden assassin Waiting to strike at you.“), but here is Harold Pinter (2002) also taking this view:

I need to see my tumour dead
A tumour which forgets to die
But plans to murder me instead.

It can get a tad existential when it turns out that the assassin is actually you, but a you that has turned on yourself in the ultimate act of betrayal.

Journey

Cancer is a road, path, or journey. You may cross the border into its domain, and you may even need the passport your diagnosis gives to allow you passage. Christopher Hitchens called that place “Tumorville“, as he was deported “from the country of the well across the stark frontier that marks off the land of malady.

You may meet fellow travellers. The journey through cancer treatment is the thing that teaches you how to live. One of the more negative implications of the journey metaphor is when people speak of the journey as pre-destined. This is the realm of “everything happens for a reason“. Before you know it, your cancer is a gift or talisman that only you can carry on your quest. The fuck it is. You’d dump it and go back to being a hovel-loving little Hobbit the first minute you had the choice.

Corruption or Rot

Cancer eats you from within. It rots down and eats away all that is healthy. Like a mould or fungus, it creeps across the space. It spreads and grows, like gangrene eats the flesh or canker takes the wood. It may, or may not be, your fault for being morally weak or sad or angry and allowing the rot to enter and take hold. The danger comes if you come to believe you can offset the rotten by imbibing only the pure and the good. Nothing wrong with assisting in early stage cannabidiol drug trials, but you can stick your coffee enemas up your a…, oh, wait a minute.

Alien Parasite

A variation on the above is that cancer is a parasite. Borrowing from the Alien movie, it is a foreign body that has taken hold of the host, and grows within. A dark and malignant “pregnancy” that proceeds by stealth. As J.M. Coetzee puts it: “Monstrous growths, misbirths: a sign that one is beyond one’s term.”  It creeps along the lymphatic system from node to node, like it’s hiding in the spaceship air ducts.

Plague

Or, a plague of locusts that plunders the once-healthy land. A wild whirlwind of destruction. Here is an example:

Kitty’s cancer is proving swift and ravenous, spreading like armies of insects eager to join together at a central hub. Tumours race through her, nesting in organs and slowly shutting them down. To them, nothing is inedible; metastases forming in bone and soft tissue, neoplasms leaving bad cells in their wake as they feast on the good. Paul Tomkins, The Girl On The Pier (2015)

Predator 

I’m guilty of using this one. “Cancer is the shadow of a shark under your raft” says I back in January. Another example I found recently is from Stephen J. Kudless: “It was a shark, her disease. It took her in many bites.”

Crash

The feeling of going through cancer is a long, drawn-out experience. Talking about his wife’s experience with breast cancer, Adrian Edmondson said: “It’s a long grind, like a slow car crash that will last five years and then, hopefully, we’ll get out.” That lack of control is often evident in metaphors such as cancer is like being on a carousel, forced to go around and around, with no way to get off.

I’m sure there are others, and it will keep me occupied looking for them. Sure, it’s something to do.